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7 reasons to give e-biking a spin

E-biking up Box Hill with Inghams Holidays

“We’re going to cycle up Box Hill,” our  chirpy, energetic PR sings rather excitedly. I laugh hysterically and shake my head. “You’re joking, right?” “Nope,” she answers, in an equally cheery tone.

I know Box Hill like the back of my hand as I went to school in Dorking, Surrey. Many a lunch hour was spent at the top of the summit overlooking the North Downs and many a night was spent at the bottom of it throwing shapes on the dance floor at the Burford Bridge Hotel, the home of Sixth Form dinner dances and various parties.

And I can confirm one thing.

It. Is. Very. STEEP.

And you know what? This is the very same location that formed part of the road race cycling event in the London 2012 Olympic Games!

Now, I’m as competitive as the best of them. And I’m certainly not one to make excuses despite the battering my health has taken of late. But I’m no flippin’ Olympian. “You don’t need to be,” the PR laughs. “We’ll be going up on e-bikes.”

This is music to my ears although I’ve never seen an electric bike before let alone ridden one. Ray Wookey, founder of Cycling Made Easy, an e-bike retailer in the UK, gives our group a quick demonstration.

Although electric bikes have a battery pack, you still have to pedal otherwise you’ll fall off. But it’s good to know that I have three ‘boost’ options to help navigate the trickier parts of the hill. I get to grips with my bike in the car park of Denbies Wine Estate and merrily pedal along before tapping the magic box next to my handlebars. Whoosh – there’s instant power. It feels rather exhilarating.

We file out of the car park and head straight to the base of Box Hill. My legs are burning within minutes of tackling the steep ascent so I tap the booster box – moments later I’m hurtling up the track at breakneck speed. It’s fan-bloody-tastic and in no time at all I’m admiring the view from the top.

 

Yes, I’m slightly huffing and puffing –  you still have to cycle – but I’m not drenched in sweat. No wonder then that Berchtesgaden in Germany, Kranjska Gora in Slovenia and Alta Badia in Italy are popular e-biking destinations. It really is a rather fantastic way to get about.

According to an Inghams Lakes & Mountains poll of 2,000 holidaymakers, almost two thirds would try a new activity on holiday. And nearly a quarter said they’d be motivated to return to a destination if it offered plenty of activities they hadn’t tried before. I’m with them on that one.

If you’d have told me at a month ago that I’d be cycling to the top of Box Hill, I would never have believed you. Bradley Wiggins I am not. But with an e-bike it seems anything is possible and I was left giggling like a schoolgirl all over again.

 

7 E-BIKING MYTHS SMASHED

Below Ray Wookey, who sells E-bikes from his Cycling Made Easy stores in Coulsdon and Tunbridge Wells, talks us through the common e-biking myths and gives seven reasons why you should give it a go. 

IT’S NOT EXERCISE
E-biking is in fact very good exercise. The motor doesn’t do anything unless you are pedalling. Just like on a stationary bike at the gym, you can choose the level of physical effort you wish to put in, simply at the touch of a button. Of course, the advantage of an e-bike over a stationary exercise bike is that you can get out and about. E-biking out in the beautiful British countryside beats sweating it out in a gym. Our own research shows that people go out on their e-bikes between three and four times a week, which matches up to recommended exercise guidelines.

IT’S EXPENSIVE:
A reliable e-bike starts at £899 but most people will spend around £2000. This might seem a lot at first, but the cost of e-biking is front-loaded. Ongoing costs are minimal. Charging the battery from flat to full takes no more electricity than the amount used to boil a kettle – about 10 pence worth. As e-bikes are classed legally as bicycles, you don’t have to spend money on insurance, MOTs, nor will you have to worry about petrol prices or parking charges. Many of our customers have stopped buying train season tickets, because there are e-bikes which cost less, and are a more reliable way to get to work.

IT’S FOR THE ELDERLY OR MAMILS (MIDDLE AGED MEN IN LYCRA)
There are as many types of people who use e-bikes as there are bikes themselves. Young professional commuters like the convenience and money saving aspect, experienced mountain bikers enjoy the fact that they can cycle as aggressively uphill as they do downhill, and then there are many people who use e-bikes as a way to cycle together. With e-assistance, no-one gets left behind. You can always lean on the bike to help you keep up with more experienced riders.

IT’S FOR THE UNFIT
Most people will find that an e-bike has a positive effect on their fitness. Cycling is a low-impact exercise anyway, and with adjustable e-assistance, you can take the pressure off your joints – especially your knees – and still get a cardio workout. You would certainly find you go out cycling more often on an e-bike than a conventional bike, because they help you overcome so many barriers.

IT’S CHEATING
‘Cheating’ is something often thrown at e-bikers. It’s only cheating in the same way that escalators are the ‘cheat’s version’ of stairs. Most e-bikers are not looking for a way to get out of exercising. It’s quite the opposite. They want to ride something that encourages them to cycle more often. It’s not cheating if you are choosing two-wheels to get your errands done, to get to work, to explore on holiday, or countless other reasons.

IT’S COMPLICATED TO OPERATE
If you know how to ride a bike, you can use an e-bike. Changing the e-assistance levels is no more complicated than pressing up and down buttons on a little panel on the handlebars. It is probably more difficult to ring the bell. The computer systems inside the motor and head display do all the clever stuff. All you have to do is choose your power level and start pedalling.

IT’S HEAVY
Most good e-bikes are around 20kg. This is lighter than a Boris bike. There’s a lot of variation depending on the components on the bike. Full-suspension adds a few kilos, but sportier models will have lighter frames. The magic of e-bikes is that no matter how heavy the bike, they feel like incredibly light bikes when in motion, as the e-assistance handles the weight. Conventional bikes suffer under extra weight. Often cyclists will forfeit the convenience of a rack and panniers, the security of a heavy-duty lock, or the versatility of bigger tyres, because they’re worried about weight.With an e-bike, all these options are open to you. Weight simply doesn’t bother an e-bike.

For more information visit:

www.inghams.co.uk/lakes-mountains-holidays

www.cyclingmadeeasy.co.uk

 

Fitness, Travel, Wellness

HOW TO TRAVEL WITH ALLERGIES: 7 MUST-READ TIPS

Ocean view Bathsheba, Barbados

I’ve always enjoyed travelling. ‘You’re always on holiday,” my friends used to quip, not realising that I’d been working 15 hour days and weekends to justify my, often very short, jaunts abroad every six weeks or so.

But when my health started playing up in December 2015, travelling was the last thing on my mind. I just wanted to get well. Then, seven months after the first allergic reaction, a travel commission came in for Barbados – a country I love and know like the back of my hand – and I couldn’t pass it up. Incidentally, Relax Ya Self is a phrase often used by locals on the island and where I got the idea for the name of this blog!

I wrote a post here on how my tongue started to swell on the eight-hour flight home. One epic fail was not to having my emergency drugs within easy reach. I know, I’m an idiot. So, I decided to make a checklist for future trips, which may help others too.

DON’T BE SHY
Tell your friends, family and fellow travellers about your allergies. Knowledge is power. They’ll need to know what you’re allergic to, the signs and symptoms to look out for, where your emergency drugs are and how to use an auto-adrenaline injector (commonly known as an Epi-Pen) if you are unable to inject yourself.

ALERT THE CABIN CREW
In my experience, the crew bend over backwards to help those with allergies. I recently flew to Tenerife with Monarch. I explained the unpredictability of my reactions, that I wouldn’t be eating on the flight because of this and reassured them that I had my emergency drugs on me and knew what to do if my tongue started to swell. The aircraft was quite empty. Guess what? They ended up moving me to an extra legroom seat at the front of the plane. It was such a kind gesture and I certainly didn’t expect it!

PREPARE YOUR OWN FOOD
Because I react to all sorts of ingredients, I now prepare my own food (in plastic containers) and forgo the meals served up by the airline. This way I know I’ll never go hungry. And I make use of the tubs again during my holiday. Not only are they super-handy if I’m out and about during the day,  it’s good to know that I can tuck into home-made food if there are no options for me on a restaurant menu (which has happened in the past!)  I just make the food in the morning. (Remember to walk with an ice pack)

CHECK THE EXPIRY DATES
Ensure your antihistamines, steroids and your auto adrenaline injector pens are in date. Often, the latter has a short shelf-life of six months.

DOUBLE UP
To be on the safe side,  I walk with two lots of medication including adrenaline pens just in case my bag goes missing or one of the pens fails to work.   Ensure they’re within easy reach and walk with a bottle of water. And if you’re in tropical climes, you’ll need to protect your adrenaline pens from the heat so remember to pack an insulated wallet or bag. I use a pretty and practical cooling pouch made by Frio.

LEARN THE LINGO
Eating out in Tenerife was particularly troublesome because I had to avoid so many foods…mature cheese, citrus fruit,  alcohol and vinegar, the latter of which popped up in everything! Fortunately, the lovely receptionist at our hotel compiled a note listing all the ingredients in Spanish together with an explanation. I carried that piece of paper everywhere I went and it gave me the confidence to eat out in restaurants.

UPDATE YOUR DETAILS
Many phones, such as the Iphone 6, have a medical ID option. Here you can list your medical conditions, allergies and reactions and any medication you take, as well as your name and date of birth. Anyone can access this information, even if your phone is locked.

 

Helen's Health, Travel