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Helen Gilbert Journalist

7 lessons I learned when I left my phone at home

7 things I learned by leaving my phone at home

There’s nothing quite like realising you’ve left your phone at home on a Monday morning to induce a state of panic, especially when you’re working for a new client in London and you’re relying on Google Maps to get you from A to B.

But this is exactly what happened to yours truly last week. I thought I’d be super organised and charge up said phone in the bedroom – far better to start the day with 100% battery in the tank and all that.

Only in between wolfing down the porridge and prioritising my to-do list, I completely forgot to retrieve the device from upstairs. On entering the railway station I realised my mistake. No amount of searching – I frantically triple-checked every inch of my handbag –  would bring it back.  My stomach began somersaulting for England.

How the heck would I survive without it?

The day before – in a bid to be Miss Efficient – I’d set an out of office (I receive on average between 400 and 500  emails per day) advising people that I’d be media training and only checking my account intermittently.  Those with urgent work-related queries could text or call me. Except now they couldn’t. I could feel my stress levels rising.

Then another realisation struck – I wouldn’t be able to check my email account because I’d be signing in on a brand new computer that would only accept my log in details via a two-step authentication code which, you’ve guessed it, would be sent to my phone! Oh, joy of joy.

There was nothing for it, I’d have to reluctantly suck up this unexpected digital detox.

This is what I discovered…

Five things I learned by accidentally leaving my phone at home

A sense of freedom

At first, I felt lost without my phone and quite anxious. Questions rattled around my head. How am I going to contact my boss? How will people contact me? What happens if the train is late? What happens if I get lost? What sort of impression is this going to make? But then I just accepted the situation for what it was and let it go. With peace came clarity. I’d been catastrophising massively – something I did when my health first went haywire – and I found myself worrying  about future situations that might not happen.  I told myself there was nothing I could do and instead focussed on the present moment. Yes, I couldn’t check the news sites or email and felt quite disconnected but there was no compulsion to endlessly scroll and it felt enormously freeing.

How to create more time

This sounds like a flippin’ obvious one but, quite frankly, I was staggered by how much time I recouped. Train journeys are usually spent catching up with Whatsapp group messages, Instagram, blog admin and general work emails. Before I jumped on board I had a quick chat with the jolly man in the coffee kiosk and on the ride into London another young commuter jokingly told me how he couldn’t face the day ahead as his flatmate had a party that had kept him up until 5am. Would I have had these conversations if I’d been glued to my phone? Probably not. Did they make me smile? Yes. It made me wonder what else I’d been missing out on.

How to be mindful in everyday life

I’ve written about mindfulness before – from hypnotherapy mind massages to group meditation sessions – but leaving my phone at home was a true lesson in everyday mindful living. I usually listen to music or the radio during the walk to and from the station. Instead, my soundtrack was the crunch of the golden autumn leaves underfoot, and the birds chirping in the trees. As cliché as it sounds, I felt very much at one with nature. Just being aware, truly present and grateful for being alive was a very uplifting way to start the day.

How to increase productivity in personal and business life

Sitting on the train, after the tired twenty-something had departed, I pulled out my notepad and began goal setting. I scribbled down feature ideas for the day job, blog post musings, and made a list of what I needed to organise at home. I was in full flow and my brain was positively singing and dancing. By the time I arrived at work I was excited at the prospect of nailing my meetings and coaching without having to worry about any other pressure or obstacles that might have been thrown in my path via emails or the phone.

It can wait. Honestly. 

Most self-employed people – I’ve been a freelance journalist for almost 20 years – worry about missing out on work and I was, in fact, expecting a call from a chap from another agency on the same day. Initially I panicked as we’d suggested provisionally meeting up after I’d finished my consultancy gig. As it turned out my contact’s meeting had been postponed and it would take him another week to call me, by which time I’d been reunited with the phone! These things always seem to have a way of working themselves out.

How to relax

Yes, I’d worked a long day in London and while the commute was always going to be far more tiring than in the days prior to my Mast Cell Activation Syndrome diagnosis, I felt energised and rejuvenated on the train journey home. My ‘butterfly’ brain had seemingly settled thanks to fewer distractions. I was very, very content and, dare I say it, relaxed!

How to manage my time effectively

Interestingly, a sense of dread, not excitement, filled my stomach when I opened my front door.  On picking up my phone I found the expected 500 emails (80 per cent were press releases) and social media notifications. There’d been three missed calls (from my dad). Oh, and I had the best part of ten WhatsApp messages, five of which requested rather time-intensive favours.

Now, I always help people out but the stark reality is that between the day job and running this blog I get very little downtime with barely a day off. On opening the messages I instantly felt overwhelmed.  As the knot in my stomach tightened, a realisation struck… I must start setting boundaries and managing my own time better for the sake of my own health, otherwise I really will be of no use to anyone.

Leaving my phone at home proved to be a blessing in disguise and taught me many a lesson.

In fact, I found the whole experience so liberating I could be tempted to do it again!

Have you ever unintentionally left your phone at home? How did you find it?  I’d love to hear from you in the comments below. 

Fancy reading the health and wellbeing tips of the stars?

Check out our chats with Jonny Wilkinson, Pat Cash, Katie Piper, Gail Porter and Ryan Sidebottom here.

 

 

Helen's Health, Wellness

WHEN YOUR FOOT DECIDES TO STOP WORKING

When your foot stops working

Yes. That’s right. Between the first and second severe allergic reaction, my right foot perplexingly started to misbehave. Just like that. On the day it happened I was working a news shift in an office. “Careful there,” my editor said as I stumbled on my way to the printer. I laughed. “I’ve got really bad pins and needles in my right foot. It must have just been the way I was sitting,” I casually responded.

Now I’m not a hypochondriac and figured there must be some reasonable explanation. Being quite a sporty person, I’m used to injuries, pulled muscles and have quite a high pain threshold.  I simply assumed my legs had been crossed or held in an uncomfortable position for too long and figured the numbness would subside. I was wrong. Five hours later my lower leg was still dead, I had no feeling in my toes. I thought things would improve by the next morning but my foot began to slap uncontrollably when I walked. So I booked an appointment to see a private physio.

My foot began to slap uncontrollably when I walked

“I don’t want to alarm you but think you need to book a GP appointment if things don’t improve,” she said after much poking, prodding, massaging and ultra-sounding. One week after the symptoms flared up, I was lying on the couch in front of my doctor who was unusually quiet as he examined me. I squirmed as my left foot and ankle were pushed, pulled and scored with a weird tool that resembled a knitting needle. Being hugely ticklish, the sensations weren’t that pleasant. He repeated the process on my right foot and ankle. “How does that feel?” he enquired. “I’ve no idea,” I replied, unable to feel a thing.

My left foot and ankle were pushed, pulled and scored with a weird tool that resembled a knitting needle

He immediately called a neurologist (brain specialist). The consultant on the end of the phone agreed to see me. My mum drove me to the hospital, but the A&E receptionist refused to accept the letter from my GP and I was told I’d have to wait in the emergency department. Many hours later I saw a doctor who then went to find the neurologist. He’d since gone home. Hours later I was x-rayed for a broken ankle – it wasn’t – before being told that I’d need to book another appointment with the GP who would refer me to the neurologist. Back to square one. I felt utterly deflated.

Not only was my foot playing up, I’d also begun to experience numbness on the left side of my face and my fingers felt as though they weren’t working properly. Alarmingly, I’d also begun dropping things without realising when distracted or in conversation. Things were really beginning to get me down. I’d always been an optimistic, glass half full person but was struggling to see the silver lining in all of this. My mind went into overdrive. My beloved aunt and cousin had both died from brain tumours at a young age. Was this the fate that awaited me?

I experienced numbness on the left side of my face and my fingers felt as though they weren’t working properly

Despite knowing better,  I turned to Google for clues. I shouldn’t have. I scared myself silly. At the same time, my tongue swelling episodes had ramped up phenomenally. Eventually, I saw a neurologist and a diagnosis of Foot Drop – paralysis/weakness in the foot –  came. Again there was no concrete explanation for it.  MRI scans of my brain were – thankfully clear – but I’d still need to be monitored.

Over on the allergy side of things my immunologist had ruled out anaphylaxis and ruled in idiopathic angioedema – unexplained deep tissue swelling. This occurs when the body mistakenly detects a harmless substance, such as a certain food, for something dangerous triggering the release of histamine to fight the threat. The protocol was to manage the symptoms in the same way one would for anaphylaxis because every reaction affected my airway.

I was also in the process of selling my house – one of the most stressful things you can do

On top of this, I was dealing with repeated bouts of episcleritis which caused excruciating pain and light sensitivity in my left eye. Having developed an allergy to ibuprofen – a painkiller I’d always been able to tolerate – I was back and forth to the eye specialist who prescribed steroids.  Oh,  and I was also in the process of selling my house – one of the most stressful things you can do.

Ironically, exercise – the one thing I’d always rely on to clear my head during stressful periods – was no longer an option. I was forced to suspend my gym and tennis memberships. I stopped socialising. And because I wasn’t well enough to do first-person fitness-based newspaper commissions, I missed out on work. I felt lost, frightened and trapped in a downward spiral. I didn’t know who I was anymore.

So what happened next? Read here. 

Helen's Health

THE VALENTINE’S GIFT LIKE NO OTHER

Valentine's gift

It’s Valentine’s Day 2017. Another afternoon, another specialist. This time I’m sitting in front of a very jolly endocrinologist (hormone specialist) armed with my A4 lever arch file of hospital letters.  It’s been more than 14 months since my health started to horribly misbehave. The unexplained and spontaneous allergic reactions, the foot drop, the bizarre sensations in my face and fingers, the stabbing pains all over my body and the extreme heaviness in my legs. Although I’ve seen a raft of specialists, there’s been no explanation for the cause of my ill health and, in some ways, not knowing has been the hardest part.

“What’s been going on?” the consultant softly asked. “I don’t know where to begin,” I sighed, before handing over a couple of sheets of well-thumbed A4 paper. Keeping track of everything had become a full-time job in itself so I had compiled a succinct list of every clinical episode and every blood result in chronological order in the hope he would be able to glance at it and arrive at a concrete diagnosis. “Interesting,” he said. After five minutes he looked up. “Your latest blood tests have come back abnormal.” I could tell from the look on his face that he was about to give me some news.

“I could tell by his face that he was about to give me some news.”

Do you know what’s wrong with me?” I replied, heart pounding before blurting out that I just wanted the reactions to stop and to feel even 80 per cent again. “It looks like an auto-immune problem that’s attacking your thyroid,” he replied before explaining that I’d need to have another scan –  this time an ultrasound of my neck to double check that there were no suspicious lumps and bumps there.

“You’ll need to go on medication right away, have your bloods rechecked and come back in see me in a month or so,” he continued. “If you respond to the thyroxine we can discharge you and you’ll then need to be monitored by your GP  every six months.”

Now,  I’m not sure how many people would be delighted with a Hashimoto’s diagnosis but I was pleased purely because something had been identified at long last. I could have kissed him.  Hope flooded through my veins, especially as the thyroid gland is part of the endocrine system, which produces hormones that coordinate many of the body’s functions. Could this be the reason why my body was acting up? Was I finally on the road to recovery?

“Could this be the reason why my body was acting up?”

A few week later I had another appointment, this time with my wonderfully patient immunologist. My tongue was still spontaneously swelling although I’d noticed a pattern – whenever I ate citrus fruit, mature cheese, marmite, baked beans, and vinegar I’d have a reaction.

During the course of my research, I’d stumbled across something called Histamine Intolerance – a condition which causes allergic-type reactions in people who do not have sufficient levels of a gut enzyme called diamine oxidase (DAO) to break down the histamine found in foods that contain high levels.

“I’d previously had skin prick allergy tests for all sorts of things including oranges, lemons, limes, and pineapple.”

Yet all had returned negative. But in those with histamine intolerance, the results always return negative because they’re allergic to the histamine in the food, not the protein. And guess what? High-histamine foods include mature cheese, wine, beer and cider, yeast, shellfish, sauerkraut, fermented soya products, and most fish. Certain fruits also release histamine including citrus varieties, grapes and strawberries!

I enthusiastically explained my findings to the immunologist who explained that there was very limited high-quality peer-reviewed research in this area. However, he also pointed out that it was not to say that the condition did not exist and supported me in my quest to try a low-histamine diet for three months, before attempting to reintroduce the food.

So far, so good. I’m having fewer reactions although I did have one recently after eating a packet of plain crisps. The intermittent stabbing pains which occur all over my body also seem to be improving so I’m keeping everything crossed.

I have a follow-up appointment with my immunologist next month and will be sure to report back on my progress.

 

 

 

Helen's Health