Insider view: 7 things you must do in Barbados

Barbados Bay

It’s no secret that I’m a fast-walking, fast-talking kind of gal who is always rushing around at breakneck speed. But there’s one country where those defining characteristics melt away in an instant. It’s called Barbados.

My admiration for this tropical paradise began in 1999 when I was on holiday with my then-boyfriend. My heart sang as soon as I clocked the powdery white sand and shimmering turquoise sea out of the plane window on our descent into Grantley Adams International Airport.

I’d never experienced anything like it and by the end of the week-long stay, I’d fallen in love with the picturesque parishes and charming, friendly nature of the island’s people. Since then, I’ve returned year after year without fail. Why? Well… this is the one spot in the world where I truly switch off. I mean truly, truly. On this island, I don’t give a flying fig about work and find it far easier to give myself permission to take time off because I’m not in England.

The vibe is contagious. A joyous silliness consumes my being and I’m instantly propelled into this carefree space I never quite manage to find in the UK. My dear friend Nicky calls it the Barbados Effect. You know the island is working its magic when a) you start moving at the pace of a snail and b) words start spilling from your lips in a dreadfully unconvincing mock Barbadian accent (well they do mine, anyway).

Barbados beach

As anyone who has been to the Caribbean can attest, everything happens at a much slower pace of life here. And I mean MUCH slower…if you need to pop to the bank, be prepared to wait in the queue for a good 45 minutes; if a friend is due to collect you at 11am, expect him on your doorstep at midday at the earliest.  While this laid-back approach to life would rile me at home, in Barbados I soak up the culture and adopt the ‘it is what it is’ motto.

Heck, this is the place I first drank coconut water out of the shell. This the place I first swam with turtles in the wild. This is the place I learned to lime (hang out). This is the place I fell in love with surfing despite being utterly useless at it and almost breaking my nose on one trip.

Oh, and this is where I was first introduced to ‘wukking up’ – an eye-opening dance that I eventually learned to get my head around only after placing my VERY British eyeballs back into their sockets.

In fact, Barbados is where I first heard the term  ‘Relax Ya Self’.  Personally, I find it much nicer way of saying ‘calm down’, ‘chill out’ or ‘get a grip’. Over the years the mantra has stuck, so much so that it became the inspiration for the name of this blog. So there you have it…the reason I keep returning to Barbados is that I absolutely revel in the much slower pace of life. As well as the weather, the food, the music, the ocean, the charm, the people. Oops, I’m off again…

Below I’ve compiled a list of some of my favourite things to do on this wonderful island, some of which are off the beaten track. I do hope you enjoy.

Is there a country or place in the world where you instantly unwind? Have you been to Barbados? What did you think of the island? Are you planning a visit? If so, I’d love to hear from you. Please do leave a comment below or Tweet, Facebook or Instagram me.

SAIL WITH CAPTAIN RON AND SWIM WITH THE TURTLES
This tops my list of things to do. I love catamarans, I love the ocean, I love turtles. And I always book a half day sailing trip with Captain Ron, who operates two vessels Why Not and It Wasn’t Me out of the capital Bridgetown. The entire experience is so seamless – perhaps unsurprising as Ron’s been doing this for the best part of 27 years. A driver collects you from your apartment and drops you to the quayside and by mid-morning you’re gliding over the calm Caribbean water to the West Coast to a soundtrack of reggae beats. Here, you’ll stop to swim with turtles and snorkel over a reef or shipwreck before anchoring up and tucking into a delicious spread of authentic Bajan food. Dishes include flying fish – a local speciality, chicken, rice and peas, macaroni pie and salad. The five-hour trip is such an enjoyable and sociable way to spend an afternoon. Always walk with a towel, SPF and hat – the average temperature is 27 degrees.

Captain Ron, Barbados

SEA VIEW DINING
As is evident from my Instagram feed, I’m completely obsessed with the sea and al fresco eating with an ocean view is my idea of heaven. Before my health took a nosedive last year, I took eating out for granted but this has been increasingly difficult of late what with my histamine intolerance and bizarre reactions. But there are two restaurants on the south coast of the island that I’m particularly fond of as the staff are super-attentive when it comes to allergy-sufferers…

CASTAWAYS BAR & GRILL
If you feel like the token pain in the butt (as I often do) when it comes to dining out, pay this beautiful restaurant a visit. Castaways owner Kris Whitton has thought of everything to keep every diner happy, no matter what their dietary requirements. Located at the top of St Lawrence Gap, this reasonably priced gem overlooks a cute bay and has a selection *yes you read that right* SELECTION of gluten-free, vegetarian and vegan options as well as meat, fish and chicken dishes for carnivores. Choose from vegan salads and tacos including mini chick pea croquets layered with almonds, corn, tomato, avocado and lime cabbage slaw – and gluten-free pizza made with cassava – a local root vegetable – base. By the way, the ocean-themed decor is stunning; the staff welcoming and service speedy. Make sure you book a sea view table and enjoy that breeze.

Castaways, Barbados

 

CAFE LUNA
This is a hidden waterfront treasure but so tucked away you could easily miss it. Tastefully decorated with stunning local pottery and pretty lanterns, this romantic setting is just past the fishing village of Oistins – home of the famous fish fry held on a Friday – and boasts magnificent waterfront views. Choose from Caribbean, Mediterranean and Asian dishes on the fine dining menu. Cafe Luna serves a couple of vegetarian dishes but the focus is on meat and fish. Try the luna“bajan” fish stew; fresh local fish,  organic sweet potato, and vegetables simmered in local pepper cream fish broth served with a garlic, herb, and parmesan bread. For afters, indulge in the warm banana crepe with triple sec cream and chocolate sauce.  I found the breeze a little chilly whilst dining under the moonlight on my most recent trip. The waiter overheard my whisper and, in the blink of an eye, a throw had been placed around my shoulders. Now that’s service for you! This place is very popular so you’ll have to book in advance.

Cafe Luna, Barbados

EARTHWORKS POTTERY
I have a confession. My cupboards are brimming with bits and bobs from Earthworks Pottery. Located in St Thomas, it’s a great place to pick up souvenirs and support local trade – the family-run business employs 20 people. Here you can see the potters craft their wares, and choose from a selection of pretty plates, bowls, serving dishes, mugs, jugs and bathroom accessories including tissue box holders. I can’t get enough of their eye-catching designs. Turn left out of the shed and up the stairs to check out the art gallery and grab a bite to eat on the balcony overlooking the countryside. It’s an immensely peaceful place.

Earthworks Pottery, Barbados

HEAD TO BATHSHEBA
Hire a car (I usually book through Coconut Car Rentals) and drive around the island. Break up your trip with a spell on the quieter West Coast beaches including Mullins (where the water tends to be calm) before heading to North Point where you can descend into the Animal Flower Cave if the sea is not too rough. The jewel in the crown is Bathsheba on the east coast. Rural, unspoilt and breathtakingly beautiful, here surfers congregate at a local break known as Soup Bowl. It’s enormously relaxing watching them cutting through the waves but be warned – you can’t swim here, the current is far too strong. Over on the south of the island, a beautiful viewing point has recently been carved into the hillside of Freight’s Bay – another popular spot with surfers, especially beginners.

Bathsheba

SUNSET YOGA
I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve been to Barbados but on my last trip, I decided to get involved with a local yoga class despite having the flexibility of a board. A lovely islander mentioned  Santosha Yoga Barbados and offered to drive me (I told you the people were nice) so I headed along for an outdoor evening Vinyassa Flow session run by Stef Lemieux. It was held among the grounds of a beautiful old plantation house called Sweetfield Manor, on the south of the island overlooking the sea. Stef also runs sunset yoga sessions on paddleboards in the water – something I can’t wait to try on my next visit!

 

Yoga, Barbados

 

 

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